Letter to the editor 2, July 23, 2020

The cost of greed

Dear Editor,

As of July 18, 2020 there are – by some reports – 140,000 deaths in the USA , 9,000 deaths in Canada, 78,000 deaths in Brazil and approximately 599,000 deaths worldwide.The cause of all these deaths has been identified as the COVID-19 virus but the killer’s true name is Greed.

Most of these deaths and all future deaths could have been avoided if profit, self-interest, the stock market and international trade were not deemed more important than an innocent life. I am sickened by what I see happening around the world and disheartened, discouraged, and disillusioned as the poor and the middle-class suffer financial hardships, uncertainty, mental anguish, depression and death while the super-rich still live privileged and pampered lives with the option of getting even richer as falling markets create bargain prices for those with the bank accounts to capitalize on them. This poem was written as an expression of my anger and concern at the injustice of it all.

Greed

Greed is a magnificent mansion, a recreational yacht, a private jet.

Greed is a border wall, a dead infant laying at the water’s edge, a child in a cage.

Greed is a power broker in a Savile Row silk suit manipulating stock and currency prices.

Greed is a struggling mother, a hungry infant, a COVID-19 patient fighting for one last breath.

Greed is a luxurious suite with an extravagant meal served with a bottle of the finest champagne

Greed is a bloated stomach, an empty plate, a broken spirit, an untreated affliction.

Greed is a designer purse, a designer car and a million dollar piece of art decorating an empty room.

Greed is an immigrant worker, a child laborer, a homeless man, a beaten and bloodied protester, a slave.

Greed is a massive estate, unlimited power, an ostentatious lifestyle.

Greed is a dying soldier in a foreign land clutching his rifle, a bombed out home, an open grave.

Sir Isaac Newton said, “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.”

How much is too much?

Is it easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God?

Are we the architects of our own destruction?

When will we ever learn?

Frank Hicks

Hudson

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