• John Jantak

Average Pincourt property tax will increase by $33 for 2019


PHOTO BY JOHN JANTAK

Pincourt is continuing its trend of ensuring it doesn’t seize houses for non-payment of property taxes. Mayor Yvan Cardinal said the town always works with homeowners undergoing financial stress to find alternative solutions to make sure property taxes are paid.

No house seizures for non-payment of taxes

Pincourt residents will enjoy an unexpected Christmas gift this year – property taxes will rise only 1.3 per cent for 2019 – less than the current annual rate of inflation which is currently pegged at 1.8 per cent and less than the average increase slated for neighbouring municipalities, The Journal has learned.

It means the average tax increase will amount to about $33 a year – just over three dollars a month – even though the town’s triennial role increased this year, raising the value of residential property an average of 7.5 per cent. The mill rate which determines the amount of property tax payable for each $100 of valuation was reduced accordingly to keep the tax increase to a minimum.

Welcoming community

The high increase in the valuation role was attributed to the town’s continuing popularity as a welcoming community for families. The town provides a large and diverse abundance of recreational and social activities for children and adults of all ages, and promotes the inclusion of all people from different ethnic backgrounds, said Town Manager Michel Perrier.

He noted that the $75 cost of the brown bins for organic recycling applicable to each household will be absorbed within the 2019 tax budget. The complete budget will be unveiled during a special sitting of council next Tuesday, December 18, 7 p.m., at the Omni-Centre.

PHOTO BY JOHN JANTAK

The $75 cost of the brown bins for organic recycling applicable to each household will absorbed within the 2019 tax budget. The complete budget will be unveiled during a special sitting of council next Tuesday, December 18, 7 p.m., at the Omni-Centre.

No house seizures

Pincourt is continuing its trend of ensuring it doesn’t seize houses for non-payment of property taxes. Mayor Yvan Cardinal congratulated Town Manager Michel Perrier and the town’s staff during the Tuesday evening council meeting.

Cardinal said the town always works with homeowners undergoing financial stress to find alternative solutions to make sure property taxes are paid. Perrier said it’s not in the town’s interest to seize houses and strives to make alternate arrangements with owners.

‘Not good to take a house back’

“This is an exercise we go through every year. It’s not a good for a town to take a house back for non-payment of taxes. First, there’s a 12 month grace period where can’t do anything with the property. We have to keep it in case the people come back and make a payment,” said Perrier.

“Then we have to put it on the market. In most cases when people cannot pay their taxes, it’s usually not the most beautiful house. It means we’ll be stuck with a house that is going to be difficult to put on the market,” he added.

Finding a suitable compromise

The town puts in a lot of effort into talking to owners and financial institutions to find a suitable compromise, said Perrier. “The last thing a bank wants to see is a sale for non-payment of taxes because they’re losing all their rights on the loans and everything. They’re not interested,” he said.

The town talks to property owners and suggests they speak to their financial institution regarding the situation, take a loan to pay the delinquent taxes and have it added to their mortgage payment. “Banks will do this but they have to be made aware,” said Perrier.

‘It’s worth it’

If an owner doesn’t responds to the town’s queries, the town will approach the bank and tell them about the situation. “In many cases, the bank will pay the taxes and deal with the owner. We also offer to make installments but people have to respect the arrangement,” said Perrier.

“It’s been at least six or seven years since we sold a house for non-payment of taxes,” Perrier added. “Our staff work hard on this issue, but we’d rather do this than go through the process of selling. It’s worth it.”

Featured Posts
Recent Posts
Archive
Search By Tags
Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Instagram Social Icon
Archives
Sections
Current Issue
ylj-2018-transparent.png

Sports

  • Facebook App Icon
  • Twitter App Icon
  • 2016_instagram_logo

             © 2020 The Journal.