• Jules-Pierre Malartre

Avengers: Infinity War – The Marvel Cinematic Universe is far from over


IMAGE COPYRIGHT SONY PICTURES

What is left to be said about Avengers: Infinity War that hasn’t already been said? It’s hard to talk about the climax to a movie saga 10 years in the making without giving any spoilers – and believe me, if you haven’t seen the movie yet, you definitely don’t want to wait until some overeager fan spoils it for you.

Superhero movies are not great art. And when it comes to Disney, a studio that cranks out movies like mass produced consumer goods, you’d expect quality to come second to quantity. I’ve also often reflected in this column on superhero fatigue; how many superhero movies are too many? However, over a decade into this wave of Marvel super-powered movies, there is still no sign of the phenomenon losing steam. Avengers: Infinity War beat all opening weekend box office records.

For the fan who has been dutifully watching all the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) movies since the very first one, Avengers: Infinity War will be the tasty cherry on top of the delicious icing on top of the amazing cake of the MCU dessert tray. Every superhero you’ve seen in their own separate movie, or as part of the team in previous Avengers movies, is there (almost).

You don’t have to read comic books to enjoy Avengers: Infinity War. Some will watch it because they have a crush on Chris Evans or Scarlet Johansson; others because they saw the first Iron Man movie when they were kids and it stuck. Others just want to be entertained. In the end, everyone gets what they wished for and that’s a sign of great entertainment.

Avengers: Infinity War is an ensemble cast, obviously. It not only brings the Avengers together; it’s a call to action for most of the other MCU superheroes who starred in their own vehicles, namely, Black Panther, Dr. Strange, Spider-Man and The Guardians of the Galaxy. It’s evident that great care went into making sure all those characters were depicted consistently with how they were developed in their own individual movies. The actors’ skills are to thank for that to a great extent, but the directors also put in a lot of effort to make sure viewers would recognize the themes and situations they have come to love from each of their favorite MCU characters. Revisiting every one of these characters in Avengers: Infinity War is like putting on your favourite pair of comfy slippers. Seeing how they interact is priceless. Most notable is the one-sided, hormone-driven competition that immediately sprouts between Star-Lord and Thor, and the instant clash of egos between Tony Stark and Dr. Strange.

It’s an ensemble cast of extraordinary characters played by gifted actors who have all settled nicely into their roles by now. It’s hard to pick the ones that shine the most, and the directors are to be credited for giving an equal amount of spotlight to pretty much all of the main characters. However, I would say Chris Hemsworth as Thor stands out of the crowd. Thor, fresh from his struggles in Ragnarok, captures the most poignant moments. His pain and conflict hit closest to home. Everything Thor went through in Ragnarok culminates in Infinity Wars. And Thor simply steals the show – twice – in the climactic end battle with Thanos.

I promised no spoiler, but Avengers: Infinity War will break your heart. Whoever your favourite characters are, chances are you will shed a few tears before the end credits roll out. But if superhero movies are anything like their comic book counterparts, they are notorious for bringing characters back to life.

One thing is certain, Avengers: Infinity Wars does not spell the end of the MCU. You only need to stick around till the end of the credit for the customary after-credit scene to see the proof.

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