• James Armstrong

Cost of paving streets in Hudson cause for debate


PHOTO BY JAMES ARMSTRONG

The future is brighter for the bridges and trails linking Jack Layton Park and Sandy Beach as council awards a contract for their repair.

The cost of paving Place Madison Street in Hudson was cause for discussion at the regular Hudson town council meeting held Tuesday, July 4. Paving the street carries a price tag of $100,000 and several residents were of the opinion that the developer should be responsible for the cost.

“We were told eight years ago that this wouldn’t happen again,” said resident Daren Legault, “that Mayfair was the last time the town would have to pay for building a road. Why is this happening again?” At the same time, Legault questioned whether or not systems were in place to prevent this from occurring. Both Mayfair Road and Place Madison are streets in the Hudson’s Valleys development.

Director General Jean-Pierre Roy replied that before the town takes ownership of streets in housing developments, that all the work concerning the construction of roads including lighting and utility services must be complete. “It was not clear, in the case of Place Madison, what the interpretation was, and now the town owns the road,” said Roy.

Legault said he wanted to know who had signed for the transfer of ownership before the road was complete and an assurance that checks and balances were in place to prevent this from happening again. Council agreed to research the Place Madison situation and report at the next council meeting.

Potable water resources

With a town-wide watering ban in place, resident Larry Gray raised the question of new sources of potable water for the town. He asked if consideration was being given to using the Ottawa River as a source and sharing the cost of developing a treatment plant with a neighboring town such as Saint-Lazare. The DG replied that council would adopt a regulation later in the meeting concerning a preliminary hydrogeological study. Roy said the search would continue for a well site alongside the current wells. “We need to find water and use the infrastructure we already own as a short-term solution,” he said.

“We are looking at the long-term viability of sourcing water out of the Ottawa River,” added Councillor Ron Goldenberg. “We came to the conclusion that it seems very feasible but there is a lot of work to be done.” Goldenberg said that a public information meeting is planned for the near future, possibly in September. “We would like to have a steering committee in place now to start working on the future,” he said. As for a partnership, Goldenberg said that the plan was to get things organized in the town first before looking for other towns to share the cost.

Adjustment for Kilteevan Road repair

Council adopted a resolution that amended the Tariff and Taxation By-Law 684-2016 adopted at a special meeting held December 21, 2016. The amendment corrected the tariff amount charged for work done on Kilteeven Road. The original amount of $1041.77 was reduced to $807.50.

Jack Layton Park bridge repair

Council passed a resolution awarding a contract of $30,000 to repair the bridge and trails linking Jack Layton Park to Sandy Beach that were closed due to the recent spring flood damage.

Hudson becoming a senior friendly town

Council passed a resolution agreeing to the signing of a memorandum of understanding with the Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services that begins the process of following the Municipalité Amis des Aînés (MADA) program over the next 24 months. The program aims to end ageism and adapt the policies, services and structures of the town to better serve its senior residents. The town will also be able to apply for financial assistance to support the establishment of senior friendly policies and structures.

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