• John Jantak

NDIP applies for subsidies ahead of landslide public information meeting


PHOTO BY JOHN JANTAK

Notre Dame de l’Île Perrot General Director Katherine-Erika Vincent said solutions to alleviate a potential landslide risk in the southwestern part of the town will be presented to homeowners at a public information meeting scheduled for Thursday evening, May 29 at 6 p.m., at the Carrefour Notre-Dame, 1300 Don Quichotte Boulevard.

The Town of Notre Dame de l’Île Perrot passed a resolution at the May 13 council meeting announcing it will apply for subsidies from the provincial government to help defray the cost of stabilizing the land in areas recently indentified in a Ministry of Transport (MTQ) report that could be prone to potential landslides.

The town’s General Director, Katherine-Erika Vincent, said the subsidies will apply to homeowners who live in the Les Palissades de l’Anse au Sable luxury home development on Simone de Beauvoir Street, a section of Perrot Boulevard directly across from the development, and along 150th Avenue, which is also included in the landslide risk zone.

Vincent was unable to provide specific details about the type of work that would be undertaken, stating that all details would be provided by MTQ representatives at a public information meeting for affected homeowners scheduled for Thursday evening, May 29 at 6 p.m., at the Carrefour NotreDame, 1300 Don Quichotte Boulevard.

The proposed subsidy would cover about 75 per cent of the cost related to the land stabilization project with homeowners possibly having to shoulder the remaining expenses. For housing developer and promoter Gilbert Rashi who attended the council meeting, the news from the town is somewhat reassuring.

“They’re proposing a solution for the issue and they seemingly would like to get financing, so they’re obviously taking a certain amount of responsibility,” Rashi told Your Local Journal after the meeting.

“Technically, they’re going to go looking for funds from the Quebec government, which is fine, but they’re going to have to come up with a share too because a portion of Perrot Boulevard is also affected,” Rashi added. “Let’s wait and see what the technical solutions to the problem are.”

The revelation that the area in the southwestern part of the municipality adjacent to the Ottawa River is now potentially prone to landslides has adversely affected homeowners who are concerned that they may be unable to sell their homes.

Rashi said he has also been affected by the situation because a stop work order issued in late 2012 when the MTQ began reassessing the landslide issue within the Les Palissades de l’Anse au Sable development has prevented him from continuing with his housing projects, rendering him unable to sell his lots and one completed house.

“The question we have to ask again is that we have a report from 2004 from the MTQ that they accepted,” said Rashi. “We subsequently have a dozen further reports and other reports from different companies on the project. They all concluded that there was sufficient stability. How can Inspec-Sol, who works for the MTQ, come up with a report that is completely negated by somebody else in the MTQ?”

Rashi said he is looking forward to the upcoming public information meeting which should reveal why the area is now more prone to landslides and is optimistic that the solutions that will be presented by the town and MTQ to alleviate the situation will help to reassure the homeowners affected.

“If they show the willingness and have a solution, it’s not a bad thing,” said Rashi. “We can sit back and argue the science of it, but if there’s a solution in place, the argument could become moot. If the recent report drove them over the edge, then the solution should calm them down.”

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